Home > 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 2.4 Integrated Technologies, 3.1 Media Utilization > EDTECH 541: Relative Advantage of Technology for Content Areas

EDTECH 541: Relative Advantage of Technology for Content Areas

Technology is a part of life whether teachers choose to use in their classrooms or not. Teachers must start to learn that part of literacy in the modern day is digital literacy, which includes “skills in using the information that technological devices carry, in addition to skills in using the devices themselves” (Roblyer & Doering 2013, p. 267).  I know teachers who are admittedly ignorant of most technologies available.  Sadly, many of these people are tremendous teachers who would construct amazing lessons around simple technology.  Roblyer and Doering (2013) note that “to be able to teach the new literacies, teachers must become proficient in the new tools that both help define literacy in the 21st century and make possible the strategies to teach it” (p. 281).

The relative advantage of integrating technology into curriculum is chiefly one of motivation and access to materials.  Personally, I think all technology integration should be done at the content area level.  When we connect with technology for a specific content area, then we know that the technology supports that specific area’s objectives and goals.  I teach langauge arts, specifically literature.  My school doesn’t provide eBooks or e-readers, but students use them if they choose.  I use technology to conduct research, teach writing skills, and locate media sources to support books.  My students are far more engaged watching a university film regarding Chaucer’s motivation in writing The Canterbury Tales than they are listening to me lecture.  Many of the technology resources that I use are visual for students:  film, presentations, or artwork.

However, I find the most benefit for students comes when they get to be hands-on with technology.  Roblyer & Doering (2013) note that technology gives students a sense of ownership, which motivates them to learn; “Technology offers a natural setting in which students can be positioned as the experts, helping redefine the student–teacher relationship” (p. 260).  Getting students to engage with technology and literature through technology can be as simple as having them type and publish their poetry or original narratives online (using technology like Scribd, Mixbook, or blogs).  They see their writing on a website that they can share with family members, which makes their efforts seem lasting and important.  I find that writing becomes a fun process for students when they can engage with techology.  Concept mapping software can help students visually organize essays and plan out their argument.  They can use digital outlining tools to help organize writing.  Once writing ceases to be a chore, students engage with it more fully.

Additionally, technology offers access to materials that teachers can’t bring into the classroom.  This week, I wrote an assignment about integrating primary source documents into a social studies activity.  I was able to use PBS.org, Smithsonian online, and History Source Online to locate primary documents to use in my class lesson on colonization.  These documents are housed overseas where I would not otherwise be able to access them.  The only option other than technology would have been to purchase a textbook with versions or excerpts of the documents.  What I found using online resources were scans of the original documents  including the antiquated typesetting and hand-drawn images from the 1800s.  These small features contribute to the sense of history contained within the documents.  A textbook would not be able to create the same material feeling.  Technology was able to bring history to my fingertips making the history more authentic and meaningful.  It can do the same for my students.

My research shows me that technology is only getting more interactive.  Using simulations and mapping software, teachers are able to make content come alive for students.  Students are able to video chat and blog with people across the globe; “these interactions provide a tremendous multicultural benefit to our classrooms that has never existed before” (Roblyer & Doering 2013, p. 269).  The world becomes a smaller place when students can work closely with “friends” across the globe.  Teaching with techology not only creates engaged and motivated students, but also it can help them to become responsible and informed global citizens.

Resource:

Roblyer, M.D. & Doering, A.H. (2013). Integrating educational technology into teaching (6th ed.). Boston: Pearson.

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  1. Anonymous
    November 13, 2012 at 9:19 pm

    Darla,

    Your post was very enjoyable to read, as it was well-written and contained relevant examples of how technology has impacted your classroom. I wholeheartedly agree that technology should be integrated at a content level. When teachers work from content objectives the technology that is integrated is far more relevant, which strengthens the technical and content skills of students simultaneously. Since technology is usually an excellent motivator, students become far more engaged in the content when the tool fits the curricular objectives.

    I love your point that technology allows students to become experts and take greater ownership and pride in their work. What excellent perks to supports technology integration! Those are exactly the skill-sets that teachers and parents hope to instill in their children.

    Excellent post this week!

    Angela

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